Afternoon Dust

supercollider

Sunset-Sunrise, part 1

Sunset, 9 July is a piece of music programmed by me and performed by the sunset on 9th July 2014. The sunset used a light sensor to interface with software synthesizers and modify some of their variables in real-time. This was enabled using code from my previous SuperCollider post.

Controlling SuperCollider using an Arduino sensor

I’ve been experimenting with controlling SuperCollider using Arduino sensors, and since it was hard to find accurate documentation of this on the web I decided to write up some of my own.

The sad news is that I could only get this procedure to work on a Linux system, though Mac users should also be able to make use of it. The code relies on the SerialPort class, which currently seems to have trouble recognising Windows serial port addresses.

Here’s what you will need:

  • SuperCollider running on Mac OSX or Linux (I used version 3.6)
  • The ArduinoSMS quark
  • Arduino board with suitable analogue sensor

For the process of installing quarks in SuperCollider, refer to the documentation. For setting up your Arduino board and sensor, see the ‘Basics > AnalogSerialRead’ and ‘Analog > Calibration’ examples included with the Arduino software.

140201_1630 (water piece)

New piece arranged and performed in SuperCollider.

This piece is a demonstration of the Part-Aleatoric Sample Machine, a project I am working on to explore possible interfaces between human and non-human listening. In the PASM, a computer uses chance principles to select samples for playback and apply effects; a human performer decides how long each sample is played for, and also operates a simple sine wave oscillator.

The samples used in the piece were recorded at Linton Falls, North Yorkshire.

140103_1504 (pluck piece)

New piece arranged and performed in SuperCollider, using code from Bruno Ruviaro (pluck pattern) and a recording of dry leaves in a pestle.

An archive containing the SuperCollider code and audio sample can be downloaded here.

This work and all associated files are released under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license.

130210.1644 (flute)

First attempt to make a piece of music using sounds from a flute. I even made a short video to go with it, though panning on my cheap tripod wasn’t exactly smooth!

Here’s the full-length piece:

This download contains a high-quality FLAC file, SuperCollider source code and required audio:

Download archive

Still snowing

I wrote about Disquiet Junto, an “association for communal music/sound-making” in my end of year review for Fluid Radio recently, but I never got round to actually joining in the fun, until now. Every week a music- or sound-making task is set; for the 55th project the task was to make a track using two piano pieces by Nils Frahm. I made a piece in SuperCollider that fed one of Nils’ tracks through a high-pass filter, the bandwidth of which was modulated using the spectral centroid of the second track. This was then mixed with a clean version of the filtered track.

You can listen to the results here.

Waves

I ran a little experiment to see what sounds I could make from a single field recording using the open source programming environment SuperCollider. You can hear the results in the sound file below - the original recording comes at the end. All of the sounds heard come from analysing and manipulating the recording.

This download contains a high-quality FLAC file, plus the SuperCollider source code and audio files. Feel free to use the code with your own recordings too - I’d love to hear the results! Suggestions for improving the code are also very welcome.

Download archive